Thursday, 24 August 2017

6 Plumbing Evaluation Tips for People Who are Purchasing a House


Are you “window-shopping” for a new house? If so, you shouldn’t forget to have the plumbing system inspected. While the overall visual appeal and structure of the house is important; the plumbing connections and furniture must also be focused. Anyway, you will find some plumbing inspections tips below for your house hunting.
1. Ask for details about the sewer line or have it checked by a qualified plumber
Sewage systems are among the most integral parts of the entire plumbing connection; which is why you should ask important queries about the sewer lines used in the house. Ask if the sewer line goes through a municipal sewage connection or if the house has its own septic tank. If the house owner or real estate agent isn’t familiar; then hire a plumber to conduct a sewer line inspection. They will be able to detect problems and improvements not only for a particular sewer pipe section but the entire sewage system. Of course, if the sewer system is in awful condition and the homeowner doesn’t do any steps to rectify it; then you’re better off finding a better property.

2. Be mindful of leaks
It's common sense to check all the plumbing fixtures of the entire house if they’re working; but some people often overlook searching for leaks or its signs. Specks of black and green moulds are an alarming sign of a possible water leak nearby. Moist areas under pipe sections are also another clear indicator of a pipe leakage. Dripping taps may seem like a minor nuisance but it can become a problem later on. Have these types of plumbing issues assessed for better evaluation.  

3. Make sure the toilet works perfectly
You will know that a toilet is in good condition when it vacates and fills water back without much trouble. Try to pay close attention for dribbling sounds since this is a sign of a leakage somewhere in the toilet. Visually inspect the base of the toilet and below its pipe connections for drenched spots as well.     


4. Check the water coming out of the taps
Don’t just open the faucets to see if it’s working; you should also check the water coming out of the taps. Houses that have been vacant for a long time will have a bit of rusty water — which is actually normal. The pipes may be old and need to be removed or the plumbing system just needs a little bit of work. However, if the home is occupied and rusty water is still being dispersed then this only means the pipes are heavily corroded.


5. Don’t forget to have the basement inspected
It’s easy to forget to check the plumbing connections of the basement since it’s hidden. Basements are prone to flooding due to its underground location; which is why you need to be mindful of leaky pipes. Busted pipes can easily flood a basement so have you need to have it checked. If there is a sump pump available then have it inspected as well.    


6. Have the water heater examined
Depending on your needs; the water heater may be an integral part of your household or not. If you use a water heating system frequently then it’s imperative that you ensure the water heater in the house you’re buying is still usable or can still last for a long time. Check the water heater’s age or ask the homeowner.

Majority of conventional tank type water heating systems last for 10-12 years. Modern water heaters like tankless heaters last for 20 years. In any case, if the water heater is past its lifetime then it must be replaced; regardless if it shows signs of damage or not.
Guest post is contributed by DRDRiP. Be sure to visit www.drdripplumbing.com.au for more plumbing tips and home improvement blogs.

2 comments:

  1. Fortunately, your stodgy eighth-grade English instructor didn't bring your persnickety eleventh-grade science educator with her, since you'd not be right.
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  2. Since, it is not possible to guess how and when a water pipe can start leaking, so I have saved the phone number of the locally based plumbers who can carry out emergency leakage repairs at a single call.

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