Skip to main content

DO YOU KNOW HOW TO JUICE?


Is “juicing” a fad or is it here to stay?  What is most important to know about juicing are provenance, preparation and combinations.  Where is the food item sourced from, who is handling it, how is it processed, and what combinations of food are important medicinally?  There are so many juices out there. Each city has local favorites such as Easy Being Green, Juice Generation, Evolution Fresh, Jugo Fresh, and Blue Print.  Sipping your nutrients has been popular for several years.  And it's no surprise—the “It drink” can provide you with loads of health benefits by upping your intake of vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients. The problem is, there's a lot of confusion about how to juice.  Dr. Michael Hall is a general practitioner and founder of The Hall Longevity Clinic in Miami Beach.  Dr. Hall cautions that, “One must be savvy and know how to read between the lines at a super market or  juice bar.” Dr. Hall decodes some of the common “juice” terms and points out common mistakes “juicing junkies” make.

“Contains 100% Juice”Everything in the bottle came from fruit or vegetables, but not necessarily the ones front and center on the label. For example, a cranberry juice might have pure cranberry juice diluted with apple or pear juice. This is still considered “100% juice.”

HPP: This stands for high pressure processing and is a non-thermal pasteurization process. This method is used to give juice a longer shelf life by deactivating certain microorganisms and enzymes.

“Raw” 
At the present time, this term is either used to refer to unpasteurized cold-pressed juice that has a shelf life of two to three days or HPP-treated cold-pressed juice with a shelf life of up to 45 days. Check the label to see if and how the juice has been pasteurized.

“Unpasteurized”A very small percentage of commercially sold cold-pressed juice in the United States is unpasteurized, though it is gaining popularity. Imagine the fresh-squeezed apple cider at a local orchard, or premium green juice blends made at popular juice bars like NYC-based Juice Press and Liquiteria. These juices have a shelf life of a mere two to three days and are usually created with organic ingredients, making them about three times more expensive than your average lunchtime juice box. 

“Pasteurized”Usually referring to thermal pasteurization, where a product is heated, pasteurization is used to prevent spoiling and to kill harmful pathogens, like E. coli. In addition to juice, milk, cheese, canned foods, wines and syrups are commonly pasteurized. Some companies use “flash pasteurization,” which supposedly maintains the color and flavor better. HPP is sometimes considered a form of pasteurization, though it does not use heat.

Cold-Pressed: This juice is created with a press and slow pulverizer. Because the process is slow and doesn't cause heat, it helps to preserve enzymes and therefore, important nutrients. This is a popular method used for store-bought juices.

“From Concentrate”Many companies create a shelf-stable pasteurized juice product by extracting water from juice and creating a “concentrated” juice product. To make “reconstituted juice,” either the consumer or the manufacturer will add in water to dilute the concentrated juice before serving.

“Not From Concentrate”Used by numerous brands including Tropicana and Florida’s Natural, this phrase was coined in the 80s to distinguish pasteurized juice from juice made from concentrate. Though no water has been removed from this product, some larger producers strip the juice of oxygen, to keep juice stable while oranges are out of season, which reduces some natural flavoring. Some companies add in proprietary “flavor packs” so the product has the taste and aroma of just-squeezed juice. The FDA does not currently require that companies list flavor packs on a product’s packaging.

Common Juicing Mistakes 
Going All Or Nothing
Some people get so caught up in a new diet trend that they think going to the extreme will provide better, faster results. In reality, that often sets one up for failure. For most of us it's extremely difficult to sustain an all-juice diet for any extended length of time. Dr. Hall says that, “The key is to incorporate juices into your diet without totally replacing your meals. For most people, a breakfast juice is a great place to start.” 

Adding Without Subtracting
Another common mistake is adding juices into your diet without subtracting other foods. Dr. Hall states that, “While juicing does provide antioxidants, it's important to keep in mind that they still have calories. Some are better than others—for instance, green juices tend to have fewer calories and sugar than fruit juices—but if you're adding these to your diet every day, well it adds up. Instead, add a juice to your diet while subtracting another food. But remember, the trick is to incorporate them, not use them to replace meals altogether.” 

Picking the Wrong Produce
The best part of juicing is that each drink you make is hand crafted from the fresh produce you put into it. Unfortunately, this leaves a fair amount of room for error. But this doesn't mean that you should load it up with so many fruits or fruit juices that it tastes like a milkshake from a fast food restaurant. If you find yourself adding entire fruit baskets to your morning drink, it's probably time for a new plan. You might end with so much sugar and calories that it negates the health benefits. Dr. Hall’s tip?  “Make sure your juices follow the 80:20 ratio- 80% greens, 20% fruit. Essentially, the fruit is there to cut the bitter taste, not to dominate your drink.” 


Juicing (and Storing) in Bulk
It's important to store your produce properly before juicing, but it's also crucial to drink any juice you make at home as soon as possible. Once all of the raw nutrients are exposed to oxygen, they have a tendency to break down. At a maximum, juices should be stored for just a few hours before drinking. After that they lose a huge amount of their nutrients and may cause you to become ill if pathogens grow from oxidation. So, if you want to reap the most benefits, drink up right after you juice up. 

Dr. Michael Hall
Dr. Michael Hall is a Miami Beach, Florida general medical practitioner specializing in longevity, anti-aging, total body wellness and rejuvenation. With over twenty years of experience in medicine; Dr. Hall is a credible resource offering his expertise on a wide array of popular health topics such as: Brain function, organ function, joint and muscle pain, stem cell therapy, tissue repair, testosterone replacement therapy, sexual health, hormonal imbalance, travel illnesses, travel vaccinations, substance abuse treatment, weight loss, skin care and skin rejuvenation.
Dr. Hall’s two-decade medical career includes international volunteer work inspiring him to pursue integrative and functional medicine. In 2007, Dr. Hall established the Hall Longevity Clinic utilizing a combination of modern Western medicine with ancient healing modalities. Dr. Hall explains that his role as a healthcare professional is to "balance the mind, body and soul". 
Dr. Hall is intensely interested in curating the best remedies and procedures aimed at increasing longevity and slowing down the aging process both internally and externally. 

Background and Education: 
Educated in New Orleans, Louisiana, Manhattan and New York, Dr. Hall  studied internal medicine at Alton Ochsner Medical Foundation and ophthalmic surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College-The New York Presbyterian Hospital and obtained a degree in health care management from the Robert F. Wagner Graduate School of Public Service-New York University. Still seeking further medical education, in 2004 he went on to complete a community and family medicine residency at Truman Medical Center-Lakewood where he became a diplomat of the American Board of Family Practice. To pursue his interest in holistic healing, Dr. Hall completed further training from the Institute of Functional Medicine-University of Miami-Miller School of Medicine.
Volunteerism:
Dr. Hall's approach to life embodies the true essence of achieving balance and good health. Caring for people, he organized relief and aided victims of 2004 Boxing Day tsunami by founding a medical mission in Batticaloa, Sri Lanka.

Comments

  1. There are so many fun and exciting Things to do and experiences around the world that I thought I ‘d put together a list of favorite things to do for all travelers.

    ReplyDelete

Post a Comment

Popular posts from this blog

Copycat Boston Pizza's Bandera Bread

Have you ever had a craving for something but then once you looked at it you realized, I can make that myself for next to nothing? That's how I felt last night I thought about ordering in some food but then realized I really don't want to spend any money. I really wanted pizza bread from Boston Pizza. So I recreated it and oh my goodness was it ever good. Try some of these great recipes too!  Pizza Bread Dough 1 cup warm water 1 tsp instant yeast 1 tsp sugar 2 cups flour  Seasoning 1 tbsp melted butter 1 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp onion salt 1 tsp parsley 1 tsp rosemary 1 tsp basil 1 tsp oregano 1/2 tsp sugar 1. Combine the water, yeast, and 1 tsp of sugar in the mixing bowl and let stand for 5 minutes. Add the flour and salt and mix until a ball of dough forms. Roll ball onto a floured counter top and knead for a couple minutes.  2. Put dough in an oiled bowl and let rise for 30 mins in a warm place with a clean cloth draped over top. While your doug

DIY Table Revamp - Guest Post

Hi all! I'm Tiffany from This Motherhood is Brought to You by Xanax and I am so excited to be a part of the Guest Post Swap and to be Amanda's swap partner! I love love love her idea on how to make indoor snowballs with egg cartons. I am definitely going to have to try that with my kiddos since my smallest one has decided that it has to snow for Christmas. Poor baby doesn't know snow is hard to come by in Alabama :( For my guest post I wanted to share a little DIY with you guys that involves duct tape! A few months ago my daughter's little chair that goes with her table she sits at every day tore and she made it worse by pulling all of the stuffing out of the seat! What started out as a quick fix turned into a great idea. She loved her seat so much that she has now decided that her table has look cool too so being the smarty pants that she is, she tore her table!

Amazing Ways To DIY Your Nails In The New Year

Having beautiful fingernails can really boost a woman's confidence. Not only do they feel sexy and sassy but they look well maintained and professional. There are a number of different styles of manicures you can get done professionally but they can be costly and if you are trying to stick to a budget and save money it is best to give DIY a try. These beautiful nail designs are easy to do and look fantastic. There are some that are more intricate and some that are simple but all will be amazed that you made them yourself. Try using small gems and crystals at the tips to add a touch of sophistication.  Tips make a world of difference and they can be as easy as you wish. There are so many beautiful polishes that have amazing colours you can match. These simple nail designs can be done by any busy lady and make a lasting impression to anyone who comes across them. Hot Beauty Health has all the instructions for these super simple nail designs. There are a large number