Tips to Select the Right Screw for DIY Woodworking


The type of screws you need for woodworking will depend on whether your project is for indoor or outdoor use, the size of your project, and the intensity of your project.

Here are some simple and practical tips that you can consider while selecting the right screw for your woodwork.

Indoor use
If you are working on an indoor project, the suitable screws are production screws, tapered steel screws and drywall screws.

Drywall screws are, however, easily breakable making them unsuitable for intense projects that require strong construction.

Production screws are one of the best indoor screws as they have sharp threads for excellent hold. You can use these screws in the hardest woods.

Outdoor use
Deck screws are one of the best screws for outdoor projects. These screws are plated to increase resistance to corrosion.

Screw materials
If you are looking for screws that have a strong resistance to rust and corrosion, look for screws made of stainless steel and silicon bronze.

Screw head
There are two basic styles – one that stays even with the wood surface, and the other that bulges out.


Bugle head and trim head screws are designed to stay even with the surface of the wood. But bugle head screws have stronger holding power. Trim head screws are suitable for moderate holding power, and they do not split delicate woods.

For stronger joint and completely hidden out-of-sight, as seen in SimplyHomeTips, it’s called for pocket screws. These screws often used to hold two panelboards at an angle through a connected deep pocket hole.

For screws that do not sit even with the wood surface, some screws can create their own recess. This is done through the presence of serrations on the underside of the screw heads. Some brands that provide this type of self-countersinking are Spax, GRK, and Quickscrew.

Some woodwork looks better with the screw head sitting on top of the wood surface. These screw heads are the pan head, cheese head (or fillister head) and the traditional round head. Small heads should not be used on softwood as it can crush the wood surface. For larger heads, you can also go for washer head screws.

Screw length
The screw must at least go through half the length of the opposing object. So, if you want to join two 2-inch planks of wood, your screw should be at 3 inches.

The other scenario is doing an L-shaped screwing if you’re working on a dining table, bed, or a chair. Say you’re screwing through a thickness of 2 inches against any length of wood with a thickness of 2 inches or more. For this, your screw length should be at least twice the thickness of your wood, which means 4 inches.

Screw drive type
The two popular drive styles are square and star. Two excellent qualities that are present in these types of screws are their ability to stick well to the drive bit and their resistance to cam out. TORX and Robertson produce these types of drive.

Apart from the above two, there is also a hybrid drive style that combines a Phillips and square drive.

Screw point and thread

Production and deck screws offer excellent points and threads with minimal splitting.

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